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B Growing vitro and young dactylorhiza

VITRO - This is the first time I have offered plants for the flask. These small tubers will have spent the necessary time in the cold to vernalise them before they arrive with me so they should start to develop leaves in April. From this stage to flowering will take two or three years depending on the original size of the tuber. I will be planting those I am growing on into deep seed trays where they will remain until they are large enough to be planted into a sales pot. Shallow terracotta pots could be used but they would need to be plunged into sand. These are idea for plants in a clod fram. I will use a mix that is fairly light and includes perlite or vermiculite. Possibly a good John Innes seed plus the additions. I will plant about 30 tubers in each tray at a depth of 1.5 cm. Once planted I will give the compost a reasonable watering and then keep the compost slightly damp throughout the growing season. The trays will be in the alpine house in semi shade and not be allowed to get warm in the summer sun. During the winter watering will be reduced and the compost should be damp enough to avoid the tubers drying up. The largest will be repotted in the autumn of 2020 ready for sale as flowering size the following spring. YOUNG PLANTS - the majority of these tubers will require a further years growth until they flower. Groups could be planted together in pots and grown on. This is the easiest way as the larger amount of compost will not dry out quickly as it does in a small individual pot. They should be treated in the same way as mature plants. They are old enough to be used for meadow planting thus enabling a larger number to be planted for the same cost. Plant in areas of fairly sparse grass cover to give the plants plenty of light.

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